International science funders and publishers are driving a growing trend in data sharing. There is mounting pressure on researchers in low- and middle-income settings to conform to new sharing policies, despite minimal empirically grounded accounts of the ethical challenges of implementing the policies in these settings. This study used in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 48 stakeholders in Vietnam to explore the experiences, attitudes, and expectations that inform ethical and effective approaches to sharing clinical research data. Distinct views on the role of trust, respect, and reciprocity were among those that emerged to inform culturally appropriate best practices. We conclude by discussing the challenges that authors of data-sharing policies should consider in this unique context.

Original publication

DOI

10.1177/1556264615592387

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics

Publication Date

07/2015

Volume

10

Pages

251 - 263

Keywords

Vietnam, access to information, biomedical data, clinical data, data sharing, ethics, information dissemination, qualitative methods, Attitude, Biomedical Research, Cooperative Behavior, Culture, Data Collection, Developing Countries, Focus Groups, Humans, Income, Information Dissemination, Policy, Qualitative Research, Research Personnel, Research Subjects, Residence Characteristics, Trust, Vietnam