Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Globalized infectious diseases are causing species declines worldwide, but their source often remains elusive. We used whole-genome sequencing to solve the spatiotemporal origins of the most devastating panzootic to date, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a proximate driver of global amphibian declines. We traced the source of B. dendrobatidis to the Korean peninsula, where one lineage, BdASIA-1, exhibits the genetic hallmarks of an ancestral population that seeded the panzootic. We date the emergence of this pathogen to the early 20th century, coinciding with the global expansion of commercial trade in amphibians, and we show that intercontinental transmission is ongoing. Our findings point to East Asia as a geographic hotspot for B. dendrobatidis biodiversity and the original source of these lineages that now parasitize amphibians worldwide.

Original publication

DOI

10.1126/science.aar1965

Type

Journal article

Journal

Science (New York, N.Y.)

Publication Date

05/2018

Volume

360

Pages

621 - 627

Addresses

Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology and MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London W2 1PG, UK. simon.ohanlon@gmail.com matthew.fisher@imperial.ac.uk.

Keywords

Animals, Chytridiomycota, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Hybridization, Genetic, Phylogeny, Virulence, Genes, Fungal, Africa, Americas, Asia, Korea, Australia, Europe, Extinction, Biological, Amphibians, Genetic Variation