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Universal HIV testing and immediate antiretroviral therapy for infected individuals has been proposed as a way of reducing the transmission of HIV and thereby bringing the HIV epidemic under control. It is unclear whether transmission during early HIV infection--before individuals are likely to have been diagnosed with HIV and started on antiretroviral therapy--will compromise the effectiveness of treatment as prevention. This article presents two opposing viewpoints by Powers, Miller, and Cohen, and Williams and Dye, followed by a commentary by Fraser.

Original publication

DOI

10.1371/journal.pmed.1001232

Type

Journal article

Journal

PLoS medicine

Publication Date

01/2012

Volume

9

Addresses

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.

Keywords

Humans, HIV Infections, Acute Disease, Anti-HIV Agents, Treatment Outcome, Time Factors