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<jats:p>The extent to which evolution is constrained by the rate at which horizontal gene transfer (HGT) allows DNA to move between genetic lineages is an open question, which we address in the context of antibiotic resistance in <jats:italic>Streptococcus pneumoniae</jats:italic>. We analyze microbiological, genomic, and epidemiological data from the largest-to-date sequenced pneumococcal carriage study in 955 infants from a refugee camp on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Using a unified framework, we simultaneously test prior hypotheses on rates of HGT and a key evolutionary covariate (duration of carriage) as determinants of resistance frequencies. We conclude that in this setting, there is little evidence of HGT playing a major role in determining resistance frequencies. Instead, observed resistance frequencies are best explained as the outcome of selection acting on a pool of variants, irrespective of the rate at which resistance determinants move between genetic lineages.</jats:p>

Original publication

DOI

10.1126/sciadv.aaz6137

Type

Journal article

Journal

Science Advances

Publisher

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

Publication Date

05/2020

Volume

6

Pages

eaaz6137 - eaaz6137