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<sec> <title>BACKGROUND</title> <p>Comorbid anxiety and depression can add to the complexity of managing treatment for people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Monitoring mood has the potential to identify individuals who might benefit from additional support and treatment.</p> </sec> <sec> <title>OBJECTIVE</title> <p>We used data from the sElf-management anD support proGrammE (EDGE) trial to examine: (1) the extent to which the mood-monitoring components of a mobile health system for patients with COPD were used by participants; (2) the levels of anxiety and depression symptoms among study participants; (3) the extent to which videos providing advice about coping with low mood were viewed; and (4) the characteristics of participants with differing levels of mood and utilization of mood monitoring.</p> </sec> <sec> <title>METHODS</title> <p>A total of 107 men and women with a clinical diagnosis of COPD, aged ≥40 years old, were recruited to the intervention arm of the EDGE trial. Participants were invited to complete the Patient Health Questionnaire-8 and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 test every four weeks using a tablet computer. Mood disturbance based on these measures was defined as a score ≥5 on either scale. Participants reporting a mood disturbance were automatically directed (signposted) to a stress or mood management video. Study outcomes included measures of health status, respiratory quality of life, and symptoms of anxiety and depression.</p> </sec> <sec> <title>RESULTS</title> <p>Overall, 94 (87.9%) participants completed the 12-month study. A total of 80 participants entered at least one response each month for at least ten months. On average, 16 participants (range 8-38 participants) entered ≥2 responses each month. Of all the participants, 47 (50%) gave responses indicating a mood disturbance. Participants with a mood disturbance score for both scales (n=47) compared with those without (n=20) had lower health status (&lt;italic&gt;P&lt;/italic&gt;=.008), lower quality of life (&lt;italic&gt;P&lt;/italic&gt;=.009), and greater anxiety (&lt;italic&gt;P&lt;/italic&gt;&amp;lt;.001) and increased depression symptoms (&lt;italic&gt;P&lt;/italic&gt;&amp;lt;.001). Videos were viewed by 64 (68%) people over 12 months. Of the 220 viewing visualizations, 70 (34.7%) began after being signposted. Participants signposted to the stress management video (100%; IQR 23.3-100%) watched a greater proportion of it compared to those not signposted (38.4%; IQR 16.0-68.1%; &lt;italic&gt;P&lt;/italic&gt;=.03), whereas duration of viewing was not significantly different for the mood management video.</p> </sec> <sec> <title>CONCLUSIONS</title> <p>Monitoring of anxiety and depression symptoms for people with COPD is feasible. More than half of trial participants reported scores indicating a mood disturbance during the study. Signposting participants to an advisory video when reporting increased symptoms of a mood disturbance resulted in a longer view-time for the stress management video. The opportunity to elicit measures of mood regularly as part of a health monitoring system could contribute to better care for people with COPD.</p> </sec>

Original publication

DOI

10.2196/preprints.14946

Type

Journal article

Publisher

JMIR Publications Inc.

Publication Date

06/06/2019