Malaria is one of the biggest contributors to deaths caused by infectious disease. More than 30 countries have planned or started programmes to target malaria elimination, often with explicit support from international donors. The spatial distribution of malaria, at all levels of endemicity, is heterogeneous. Moreover, populations living in low-endemic settings where elimination efforts might be targeted are often spatially heterogeneous. Geospatial methods, therefore, can help design, target, monitor, and assess malaria elimination programmes. Rapid advances in technology and analytical methods have allowed the spatial prediction of malaria risk and the development of spatial decision support systems, which can enhance elimination programmes by enabling accurate and timely resource allocation. However, no framework exists for assessment of geospatial instruments. Research is needed to identify measurable indicators of elimination progress and to quantify the effect of geospatial methods in achievement of elimination outcomes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70140-3

Type

Journal article

Journal

The Lancet Infectious Diseases

Publication Date

08/2013

Volume

13

Pages

709 - 718