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There are limited data on osteoarticular infections from resource-limited settings in Asia. A retrospective study of patients presenting to the Angkor Hospital for Children, Cambodia, January 2007-July 2011, identified 81 cases (28% monoarticular septic arthritis, 51% single-limb osteomyelitis and 15% multisite infections). The incidence was 13.8/100 000 hospital attendances. The median age was 7.3 years, with a male/female ratio of 1.9:1; 35% presented within 5 days of symptom onset (median 7 days). Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 29 (36%) cases (52% of culture-positive cases); one isolate was methicillin-resistant (MRSA). Median duration of antimicrobial treatment was 29 days (interquartile range 21-43); rates of surgical intervention were 96%, and 46% of children had sequelae, with one fatality. In this setting osteoarticular infections are relatively common with high rates of surgical intervention and sequelae. Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest culturable cause, but methicillin-resistant S. aureus is not a major problem, unlike in other Asian centers.

Original publication

DOI

10.1093/tropej/fms044

Type

Journal article

Journal

Journal of tropical pediatrics

Publication Date

02/2013

Volume

59

Pages

36 - 42

Addresses

Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia. nicole.stoesser@ndm.ox.ac.uk

Keywords

Humans, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcal Infections, Arthritis, Infectious, Osteomyelitis, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Treatment Outcome, Surgical Procedures, Operative, Incidence, Multivariate Analysis, Logistic Models, Risk Factors, Retrospective Studies, Pediatrics, Sex Distribution, Adolescent, Child, Child, Preschool, Hospitals, Pediatric, Cambodia, Female, Male