An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis.

Original publication

DOI

10.1371/journal.pgen.1002514

Type

Journal article

Journal

PLoS Genet

Publication Date

02/2012

Volume

8

Keywords

Genes, MHC Class I, Genes, MHC Class II, Genetic Association Studies, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, HIV Infections, HIV-1, HLA-B Antigens, HLA-C Antigens, Humans, Killer Cells, Natural, Polymorphism, Genetic, Protein Binding, Psoriasis, Receptors, KIR3DS1